Radamanth

Roubens Maximilianos (Mαξιμιλιανός Ρουμπένς)

A very significant Armenian architect. He studied architecture in the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Constantinople. He then settled down in Thessaloniki, where he was engaged in various projects for wealthy members of the various Communities of the city.
He was particularly active in the first half of the 20th century.
Among his chef-d-oeuvres are:
-A10 (ca 1925, 10 Aminda str. ),
-Aaron Mois Building I (ca 1931, 9 Aristotelous str.),
-Aaron Mois Building II (ca 1938, Yeoryiou Stavrou str.),
-Afias Building (ca 1935, Amvrossiou Mediolanon & Antigonidon str.),
-Ahilion Building (ca 1923, 19 Vassileos Irakliou & Venizelou str.)
-Allatini Mansion in the French Quarter (originally built by Vitaliano Poselli (ca 1874) and reconstructed by Roubens in 1926),
-Antigonidon 10 (ca 1922, Antigonidon 10 str.),
-Doiranis 27
-Egnatia 34 (ca 1925, 34 Egnatia str.),

-Egnatia 72 (ca 1931, 72 Egnatia str.),
-Filipou 39 (ca 1929, Filipou 39 str.),
-Siskos Building (ca 1928, 41 Filipou str.),
-Filipou 33 (ca 192.., 33 Filipou str.),
-Filipou 17 (ca 1923, 17 Filipou str.),
-Filipou 11 (ca 1930, 11 Filipou str.),
-Filipou & Siatistis (ca 1934, 12 Siatistis & Filipou str.),
-Hotel Grande Bretagne (ca. 1925, Egnatia str., currently housing University faculties),
-Hotel ilisia (ca.1924, Egnatia str.),
-Hotel Kastoria (ca. 1925, Egnatia str.),
-Casa Pinchon (ca 1922, 3 Klissouras str.),
-Kassandrou 44 (ca 1930, Kassandrou 44 str.),
-Klissouras 7 (ca 1922, 7 Klissouras str.),
-Makedoniko Megaro (ca 1927, 11 Dimitriou - Karaoli & Gladstone str.),
-Mallah & Sevi Building (ca 1928, Leondos Sofou & Valaoritou str.),
-Matarasso & Alcheh Building (ca 1926, 14 Katouni str.)
-Mela 25 (ca 1929, 25 Pavlou Mela & Grigoriou Palama str.),
-Meimaris Mansion (ca 1930, 26th Oktovriou str.),
-Mitropoleos 59 (ca 1930, 59 Mitropoleos str.),
-Papaioanou Mansion (ca 1931, 1 Terpsitheas Square),
-Paster & Ayiou Dimitriou
-Saadi Alevi str. 20 & 22
-Shalom Mansion (ca. 1...., Miaouli & Vasilissis Olgas str.)

-Solonos 110
-Svolou 44 (ca 1935, 44 Svolou & Ipodromiou str.)
-Victoria Building (ca 1933, Tsimiski & Komninon str.)
-Bit Pazar (ca 1928, in collaboration with D. Filizis, Venizelou & Tositsa & Olimbou str.)

SAINTPAULIA - AFRICAN VIOLET 2015 collection

Saintpaulia, commonly known as African violet, is a genus of 6 species of herbaceous perennial fl

owering plants in the family Gesneriaceae, native to Tanzania and the adjacent southeastern Kenya in eastern tropical Africa, with a concentration of species in the Nguru mountains of Tanzania. The genus is most closely related to Streptocarpus, with recent phyllogenetic studies suggesting it has evolved directly from subgenus Streptocarpella. The common name was given due to a superficial resemblance to true violets (Viola, family Violaceae).

The genus is named after Baron Walter von Saint Paul-illaire (1860-1910), the district commissioner of Tanga province who discovered the plant in Tanganyika (now Tanzania) in Africa in 1892 and sent seeds back to his father, an amateur botanist in Germany. Two British plant enthusiasts, Sir John Kirk and Reverend W.E. Taylor, had earlier collected and submitted specimens to Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew in 1884 and 1887 respectively, but the quality of specimens was insufficient to permit scientific description at that time. The genus Saintpaulia, and original species S. ionantha, were scientifically described by J. C. Wendland in 1893.

Saintpaulias grow from 6-15 cm tall and can be anywhere from 6-30 cm wide. The leaves are rounded to oval, 2.5-8.5 cm long with a 2-10 cm petiole, finely hairy, and with a fleshy texture. The flowers are 2-3 cm diameter, with a five-lobed velvety corolla ("petals"), and grow in clusters of 3-10 or more on slender stalks (peduncles). Flower colour in the wild species can be violet, purple, pale blue, or white.

Several of the species and subspecies are endangered and many more are threatened, due to clearance of their native cloud forest habitat for agriculture.

Saintpaulias are widely cultivated as house plants. Until recently, only a few of these species have been used in breeding programs for the hybrids available in the market; most available as house plants are cultivars derived from Saintpaulia ionantha. A wider range of species is now being looked at as sources of genes to introduce into modern cultivars.

Over 2,000 cultivars have been selected for horticultural use. There are many different leaf and flower types found; cultivars are classified as Large, Standard, Trailing, Semi-mini, Mini, and Micro - with Micro being the smallest. There is a wide range in colour from white, pink, violet, dark red, yellow to even green, and the flowers may be either single (five petals) or double (more than five, with some or all of the stamens converted into extra petals). Flowers are not always a solid colour, but can also be found in the "fantasy" variety where the petals have coloured stripes. One interesting flower form found in the African Violet are known as a "wasp"; these flowers have the upper two flower petals independently fused forming a tube. There are also compound leaves on some, that are called "bustled".

Saintpaulias can be propagated by leaf cuttings (essential for propagating named cultivars) or seed (from which new cultivars are selected). African violets prefer a constant temperature between 20-25 °C (68-77 °F) with high humidity, and thrive best planted in well-drained humus or compost.

References : Wikipedia

Here is a collection of the hybrids I currently grow.

epiphytic species

SELENICEREUS, ZYGOCACTUS, SCHLUMBERGERA, RHIPSALIS, RHIPSALIDOPSIS, HATIORA, EPIPHYLLUM HYBRIDS, MARNIERA CHRYSOCARDIUM

Gennari L. (Τζενάρι Λ.)


Arditti - Benroubi Building (ca 1925, Dragoumi & Solomou str.),

Cine Dionysia (ca 1925, Ayias Sofias str.),

Haim Cohen Building ( ca 1927, Paikou & Singrou & Valaoritou str., reconstruction of the Ismael Pasha Hani)

Longos Mansion (ca 1925, Μέγαρο Λόγγου, aka Red House - Κόκκινο Σπίτι, Ayias Sofias Square)

jewish community (life and days)

Thessaloniki housed a major Jewish community of Sephardic origin till 1943. It 's the only known example of a city in the Jewish diaspora of this size that retained a Jewish majority for centuries.

The Jews' arrival for the most part followed the Alhambra Decree in 1492, by which the Jews of Spain were expelled from the country.
Thessaloniki's Jews were inextricably linked to its history and the influence of the community both culturally and economically was strongly felt. The community experienced a golden age in the 16th century and a progressive decline until the middle of 20th century.

After the outbreak of WWII the history of the Jews of Thessaloniki took a tragic course. The implementation of the Nazis' Final Solution in Greece resulted in the near-extermination of the entire community.

The Jews initially settled in Thessaloniki in 140 BC coming from Alexandria. Flavius Josephus talks about Jews in Macedonia and further reference to them is made in a letter from Herodes to Caligula dated 10 AD.

Another important reference to the presence of an organized Jewish Community in Thessaloniki is to be found in the Acts of the Apostles. The relevant passage informs us that Paul visited the city in 50 AD and preached at the local Synagogue.

There is evidence of a continuous presence of a Jewish Community in Thessaloniki in Roman and Byzantine times. These Jews were called "Romaniotes". They had hellenized names and spoke Greek. In the middle of the 14th century more Jews arrived in Thessaloniki from Western and Central Europe, Sicily and Italy.

However, the most significant settlement was that of 15-20.000 Spanish Jews (Sepharadim) who, being percecuted by the Catholic kings Ferdinand and Isabella and the Holy Inquisition, left Spain and settled in Thessaloniki in 1492. More exile Jews from Sicily, Portugal and North Africa arrived as well. All these people settled in Thessaloniki which was almost totally deserted after its conquest by the Turks in 1430. They occupied the area from Vardari Square to Diagonios (Pavlou Mela) Street and from Egnatia Street to the waterfront promenade.

Demographically, the Jews were the dominant element of the city and turned it into a first rate commercial center. The Sepharadim distinguished themselves in the field of textiles, worked in the mines of Gallikos River, founded the first printing house in Thessaloniki in 1520 and many of them distiguished themselves as rabbis, physicians, philosophers, poets and lawteachers. Thus, the fame of Thessaloniki spread all over Europe, the Middle East and North Africa. This is why Thessaloniki was given the honorary title of "Mother of Israel".

The prosperous period was interrupted at the beginning of the 17th century. Commerce received a blow after the discovery of new sea routes and the city itself suffered consecutive fires and epidemics. Still, the determining event was the appearance of a self-proclaimed Messiah, Sabetai Sevi (1655). His popularity alarmed the Ottoman Authorities who arrested him and condemned him to death (1666). In order to save his life Sabetai Sevi converted to Islam. Three hundred Jewish families followed his example.

This mass apostasy truly shook the community which recovered only as late as the middle of the 19th century. From 1873 on the Jews received advanced European education thanks to the Alliance Israelite Universelle Schools. It was at that time that the first newspaper ever was published in Thessaloniki. It was the Jewish paper "EL LUNAR" (1864). Industrial development was launched too, with the big steam mill of the Italian-Jews of the Allatini family (1854).

The Jews dominated the commercial scene, were active in all professions and were by far the largest labour force in the city. In 1891, the Jewish Community founded the working-class neighbourhoods of Baron Hirsch and Kalamaria and established a whole chain of brilliant and unique charity institutions. They created a welfare system that has not been equaled in any other Diaspora community (Allatini and Mair Aboave orphanages, the Baroness de Hirsch Hospital, a Mental Asylum, Saoul Modiano Old People's Home, Bikour Holim Health Organization, etc.). The community had more than 30 Synagogues, numerous chapels and parish schools and the great traditional "Talmoud Torah Agadol" School. After the revolution of 1908 the socialist organization "Federation" was founded and the first Zionist groups made their appearance (Bene Sion, Kadima Macabbe, Misrahi, etc.).

On October 26, 1912 Thessaloniki becomes Greek again. The leaders of the Community meet King George I and the Prime Minister El. Venizelos who promise to respect the rights of the community and guarantee equal rights.
According to the Greek Authorities Census the Jews of Thessaloniki were 61,439 as compared to 45,867 Muslims, 39,936 Greeks and 10,600 people of other origin.
A few years later the City was devasted by the 1917 fire. The Community was cruelly hit. It numbered 53,000 homeless members. Almost all synagogues, schools and charity institutions were destroyed.

Many Jews emigrated in the period between the two Wars, especially after the arson of the Campbell refugee camp by extremists (1931). Most of them settled in Palestine. Still, in 1940 the Community numbered more than 50,000 people. The Jews of Thessaloniki lived peacefully along with their Christian neighbours. They fought bravely for their homeland during the 1940-41 War.

Thessaloniki's occupation by the Axis Forces (April 9, 1941) was the beginning of the end. The Nazis applied anti-Jewish measures from the very first days. They forbade the admission of Jews to cafes, cinemas etc. They took over the Hirsch Hospital and many Jewish houses, imprisoned members of the Community Council, looted the Community offices, destroyed its archives and all Jewish libraries. On July 11, 1942 all male Jews between 18 and 45 years of age were ordered to present themselves at Eleftherias Square. After incredible humiliations, their names were taken down and they were led to labour camps. The Community paid a 2,5 billion drachmas ranson to free them. At the end of the same year all Jewish enterprises were confiscated and the more than 2000 year old Jewish Cemetery was destroyed.

As of February 1943 the Jews vere obliged to wear a Yellow Star badge on their breasts and live only in certain areas (ghetto). On March 15, 1943 the first train left for the death camps of Auschwitz and Birkenau. Another eighteen convoys would follow. Their destination was the place of their extermination. A very small number managed to escape thanks to the help of Christian friends or joined the Resistance Forces. Only few Jews returned to Thessaloniki after its liberation in October 1944 and together with few refugees from the death camps they managed to start a new life from the ruins.

Poselli Vitaliano (Βιταλιάνο Ποζέλι)

(Sicily 1838-1918)
The most famous italian architect who lived and worked in Thessaloniki in the last quarter of the 19th century.
It can easily be said that he was the official architect of the Ottoman Administration of Thessaloniki for a period of almost thirty years (1880-1910) and also one of the most prolific architects of the city.
He initially lived in Constantinople and worked for the Sultan, but after 1885 he moved to Thessaloniki where he was engaged in various projects both public and private for nearly all the religious groups of the city.


Among his structures for public use are:

Allatini Mills (ca 1896-1900, Mύλοι Αλλατίνι, 42 Papandreou & Sofouli str.),

Armenian Church of Virgin Mary (ca 1903, Αρμενική Εκκλησία της Παναγίας, 4 Dialeti str.),

Banque d' Athenes (ca 1904, Τράπεζα Αθηνών, aka Museum of the Jewish presence in Thessaloniki - Μουσείο Εβραϊκής παρουσίας, 13 Ayiou Mina str.),

Banque de Salonique (ca 1904, Τράπεζα Θεσσαλονίκης, aka Stoa Malakopi -Στοά Μαλακοπή, Singrou & Vilara str.),

Catholic Church of the Immaculate Conception (ca 1897, Καθολική Εκκλησία της Αμώμου Σύλληψης της Θεοτόκου, 19 Frangon str.),

Cite Saoul (ca 1881, Saoul Arcade, Stoa Saoul - Στοά Σαούλ, Vassileos Irakliou & Venizelou & Ermou str., partly reconstructed in 1929 by Eli Modiano),

Idadiye (ca 1877-8, aka Palia Filossofiki - Παλιά Φιλοσοφική, Ethnikis Aminas street, currently housing various University Faculties),

Konak (ca 1891, Κονάκι, aka Diikitirio - Διοικητήριο, Ayiou Dimitriou str.),

Ottoman Imperial Bank (ca 1904, Οθωμανική Αυτοκρατορική Τράπεζα, aka Kratiko Odio - Kρατικό Ωδείο, Leondos Sofou & Frangon & Tipou str., currently houses the State Conservatory. Originally built for the wealthy merchant Jake Abbott, reconstructed after the 1890 fire [plans by Barouch & Amar]. rebuilt after the 1904 blow up [plans by Poselli] ),

St Paul Catholic Hospital (ca 189, Καθολικό Νοσοκομείο Αγιος Παύλος, Frangon str., demolished in the 60s),

Third Imperial Corps HQs (ca 1903, Αρχηγείο του Τρίτου Σώματος του Οθωμανικού Αυτοκρατορικού Στρατού, aka Stratiyio - Στρατηγείο, Stratou Avenue),

Yeni Camii (ca 1902, aka Yeni Jami / Palio Arheoloyiko Moussio - Γενί Τζαμί / Παλιό Αρχαιολογικό Μουσείο, 30 Arheologikou Moussiou str.).



His most famous structures of private use are:

Allatini Mansion (ca 1888, Villa Allatini - Βίλα Αλλατίνι, 198 Vassilissis Olgas & Ploutonos & Papandreou str.),

Allatini Mansion in the French Quarter (ca 1874, έπαυλη Αλλατίνι στο Φραγκομαχαλά, Singrou & Valaoritou & Vilara str., reconstructed by Roubens in the 20s) and

Morpurgo Mansion (ca 1906, έπαυλη Μορπούργο, aka Villa Zardinidi - Bίλα Ζαρντινίδη,16 Heronias str.)



Among his structures that no longer exist we should mention :

Beth Saoul Synagogue (ca 1898, Saadi Alevi str., destroyed by the Nazis in 1943),

Passage Lombardo (ca 1...., Leondos Sofou & Frangon str., demolished in 1967),

Ida Mansion (ca 1886, Vassilissis Olgas & Fleming str., where the Italian Cultural Institute is today ) (demolished in 1959),

Samuel Hassid Mansion (ca 1907),

Nessimbe Appartment House




References: B. S. Kolonas – L. G. Papamattheakis, Ο αρχιτέκτονας Vitaliano Poselli: Το έργο του στη Θεσσαλονίκη του 19ου αιώνα (The architect Vitaliano Poselli: His work in the 19th century Thessaloniki), Thessaloniki 1980

Ayia Sofia (Saint Sophia - Αγία Σοφία)

Ayia Sofia

AΓIA ΣOΦIA. Χτίστηκε τον 7ο αι. στα ερείπια μεγάλης πεντάκλιτης βασιλικής του 5ου αι. και εξελίχθηκε σε πυρήνα ενός ευρύτερου συγκροτήματος κτιρίων διοικητικού και λατρευτικού χαρακτήρα, αποτελώντας το μητροπολιτικό ναό της πόλης, αφιερωμένο στο όνομα της Σοφίας του Θεού. Το 1524 μετατράπηκε σε τζαμί, το 1890 κάηκε και το 1907-1909 αναστηλώθηκε. Αποδόθηκε στη χριστιανική λατρεία μετά την απελευθέρωση του 1912. Πρόκειται για ορθογώνιο κτίσμα με κεντρικό σταυρόσχημο πυρήνα, στεγασμένο με τρούλο και περιβαλλόμενο από στοά στις τρεις πλευρές, ενώ στην ανατολική διαμορφώνεται το τριμερές ιερό. Στη σημερινή μορφή του, τελείως διαφορετική από την αρχική, το μνημείο διασώζει μέρος του ζωγραφικού διακόσμου του, ψηφιδωτά 8ου-12ου αι. στον τρούλο και το ιερό, καθώς και τοιχογραφίες 11ου αι. στο νάρθηκα.

JEWISH THESSALONIKI (Pt I)

Thessaloniki housed a major Jewish community of Sephardic origin till 1943. It 's the only known example of a city in the Jewish diaspora of this size that retained a Jewish majority for centuries.
The Jews' arrival for the most part followed the Alhambra Decree in 1492, by which the Jews of Spain were expelled from the country.
Thessaloniki's Jews were inextricably linked to its history and the influence of the community both culturally and economically was strongly felt. The community experienced a golden age in the 16th century and a progressive decline until the middle of 20th century.
After the outbreak of WWII the history of the Jews of Thessaloniki took a tragic course. The implementation of the Nazis' Final Solution in Greece resulted in the near-extermination of the entire community.
The most important structures owned, built for or built by Jews that still survive are:
a few deserted buildings in Analipsi, Depot and Faliro Quarters
-Casa Benveniste (Tefik Efendi) (ca 1907, Οικία Μπενβενίστε, Delfon & Paraskevopoulou & Konstandinidi str.),
-Italia Yassan Synagogue (ca 1907, 48 Velissariou str., originally built as Eliezer & Yakov Nefoussi Mansion, in 1931 bought by the Jewish Community to house the Yosef Issac Nissim Foundation and the Italia Yassan Syanagogue (destroyed in the 1917 Fire), currently deserted)
-Karolos Allatini Orphanage House (ca 1898, Ορφανοτροφείο Καρόλος Αλλατίνι, Spartis & Paraskevopoulou & Vizandiou str., currently deserted),
-Kazes School (ca 1920, Σχολή Καζές, Papanastassiou & Italias str., aka Ayios Stilianos Municipal Asylum for infants, Δημοτικό Βρεφοκομείο Άγιος Στυλιανός),
-Marocco J. - Bourla Mansion (ca 1906, 133 Vassilissis Olgas & Sindika str.)
a few deserted houses and shops in the French Quarter (namely in Ayiou Mina, Edessis, Katouni, Vassileos Irakliou and Verias str.)
-Algava-Shevah-Hassid Building (ca 1925, 3 Vassileos Irakliou str., plans by Kambanelos G.),
-Kirtsi-Bensussam Hani (ca 1900, 5 Edessis str.)
few buildings scattered around the city center such as:
-Casa Cuño (ca 192...., Οικία Κούνιο, Isavron str.),
-Casa Fedi (ca 192...., Οικία Φέδι, Antigonidon str.),
-Casa Parente (ca 1908, Οικία Παρέντε, Vakhou & Promitheos str., about to be demolished),
-Casa Pichón (ca 1922, Οικία Πιτσόν, 3 Klissouras str., in the former Rogos Quarter, plans by M. Roubens),
-Casa X (ca 1925, Οικία X, 7 Klissouras str., in the former Rogos Quarter, plans by M. Roubens),
-Alberto & Allegra Ergas Residence (ca 1925, 19 Solomou & 41 Venizelou str., plans by Yotopoulos Konstandinos),
-Haim de Boton Building ( ca 1924, aka Zenith Building, Μέγαρο Ισαάκ & Ροβερτόν Χαϊμ δε Μποτόν, 8 Mitropoleos & Venizelou str., plans by Jacques Moshe),
-Hasson - Nahmia Residence (ca 1928, 56 Olimbou str., plans by Manoussos G.),
-Hirsch Arcade (ca 1925/1952, housing till recently the Jewish Community of Thessaloniki HQs, demolished in 2008),
-Nea ilisia Arcade (ca 1924, Ermou & Venizelou str.),
-Melka (ca 1906, Ayiou Mina & Venizelou str.),
-Mordoh Building (ca 192..., 23 Tsimiski str. & 15 Komninon str.),
-Mois Hassid Complex (ca 1925, Vas. Irakliou & Kapodistriou str., 2-3 buidings),
-Morpurgo Building (ca 1929, 25 Tsimiski str. & 18 Komninon str.),
-New Market (ca 19 , Ermou str.),
-Saltiel - Salem Building (ca 1925, Kapodistriou & Paikou & Dragoumi & Valaoritou str.),
-Sigger-Rozi Building (ca 193..., 36 Venizelou & Spandoni str.),
-Stein Building (ca 1908, Venizelou & Kalapothaki str., plans by Ernst Levi)
-Vegetable Market Building (ca 192.., Amvrosiou Mediolanon str.)
few industrial buildings scattered around the east part of the city [vide INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS],
-Allatini Tile Industry (after 1917, est. 1858, Thermi),
-Benusilio Silk Factory (ca 189..., Pilea)
few industrial buildings scattered around the west part of the city
VILKA (vide INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS)
FIX (vide INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS)
and very few deserted hovels in former "Baron Hirsch Quarter", Ramona (Rezi Vardar, aka Ksirokrini) Quarter, Ayia Paraskevi Quarter and Stavroupoli District.

SYNAGOGUES

Surviving Syanagogues

1. Monastiriotes Synagogue (ca 1925-27, 37 Singrou str., named after Monastiri, a small town in northern Macedonia (currently in FYROM), the place where the founding members (Ida Aroesty was the main donor) originally came from, plans by Eli Levi),

Monastirli Jewish families Albala | Alkotser | Aroesty / Aresty / Arueste | Baker / Beahhaar / Ben Yakaar | Calderón | Camhi / Kamhi | Cassorla / Kassorla / Elias | Castro | Chame | Ergas | Esformas | Farash / Farraggi / Farrache | Fermo | Franco | Hasson | Israel | Levi / Levy | Massot | Mayo | Nahmias | Navon | Negrin | Pardo | Passo / Pesso | Rabeno | Russo | Sarfati | Sid | Testa | Yisrael | Yona

2. Yad Lezikaron (ca 1984, 24 Vassileos Irakliou str., where Bourla Synagogue used to be)

3. Italia Yassan (ca 1907, 48 Velissariou str., originally built as Eliezer & Yakov Nefuse Mansion, in 1931 bought by the Jewish Community to house the Yosef Issac Nissim Foundation and the Italia Yassan Syanagogue (destroyed by the 1917 Fire). currently deserted).

other old Synagogues (destroyed)

Vardar (St. Voutira str., Baron Hirsch Quarter)

Talmud Torah Hirsch ( Baron Hirsch Quarter)

Larissa (38 Promitheos str.)

Ets Haim (Saint Paraskevi quarter)

Serrero (5 kalvou str.)

Neve Chedek (49 Spartis str.)

Ismael (8 Kiprou str.)

Beth Itshak Herrera (73 Makedonias str.)

Beraha (12 Afroditis str.)

Bourla (Vas. Irakliou & Komninon str)

Beth Yehuda (2 Menekse str.)

Castilla (Kalamaria District)

Yahia (Kalamaria District)

Kalamaria (Kalamaria District)

Beth Israel (151 Settlement, blown up by the Nazis)

Beth Saoul (Saadi Alevi str., blown up by the Nazis)

Italia Haddash Sarfati (Pitakou & Thalitos str.)

Mayot Seni (6 Settlement)

Askenaz (47 Vas. Irakliou str.)

Lisbon Haddash (74 Vas. Olgas str.)

Or Haim (64 Vas. Olgas str.)

Kiana (3 Valaoritou & Tandalidou str.)

Gerush (Ptolemeon str.)

Hassid (37 Andigonidon str.)

Mograbi (Hirsch Hospital)

Ar Gavoa (Harilaou District)

Beth Yakob Chegno (22 Filipou str.)

Ahabat Olam (42 Ptolemeon str.)

Bello (60 Miaouli str.)

Budo (151 Settlement)

Otrnato (Karagats District)

Beth El (109 Mitropoleos str.)

Talmud Torah Agadol (3 Edmond Rostand str.)

Sicilia Yassan (3 Rogoti str.)

Italia Yassan (Tsimiski & Diehl str.)

Sicilia Hadash (13 Sarandaporou str.)

Nehohe Shalom ( Kastorias str.)

Marmores (7 Omirou str.)

Ezrati (73 Vassileos Petrou str.)

Carasso (16 Spartis str.)

Bezes (1 Filias str.)

Old Thessaloniki Synagogues and the related families (all of them destroyed in the 1917 Great Fire).

Mayor (Mallorca)- (Velissariou str.)
Cuenca, Ferrera, Arotchas, Baraja, Ben Mayor, Torres, Francés.

Provincia (Provence) - (Vardar District)Yeoshua, Barouch, Menachem, Eskenazy, Haim, Pitchón, Paladino.

Estrouk (León) - (14 kalvou str.)
Pinto, Chiniyo, Aragon, Faradji.

Catalán Hadash (Cataluña) - (Velissariou str.)Saporta, Arditti, Aliman, Mandel, Shalem, Almosnino, Moussa.

Bet Aharon (Galicia) - (Vardar District)Cassouto, Saragoussi, Toledano, Franco, Avayou, Israel, Leal.

Aragón (Aragón) - Chiniyo, Pinto, Azouz, Hanania, Yona, Nahoum, Levi, Sarfati.

Portugal (Lisboa) - (Parodos Kassandrou str.)
Melo, Ferrera, Raphael, Arari,Rangel, Miranda, Boueno, Hernandez, Perez, Pinto.

Evora (Evora) - ( Ahce Mecit Quarter)
Pinto, Ovadia, Attias, Rouvio, Ergas, Amarillio, Bivas.

Shalom (Extremadura) - (Vardar District) Molho, Pérez, Benveniste, Albukerk, Kuriat, Litcho, Saloum, Alvo.

Sicilia (Sicilia) - Ouziel, Berakha, Hazan, Segoura, Shami, Shaban, Menashe, Haver, Levi.

Calabria (Calabria) - Profeta, Rousso, Comprado.


References
Molho, Michael. Les Juifs de Salonique. 1956.
Mazower, Mark. Salonica, city of Ghosts. 2005
Saporta y Beja, Refranes de los Judíos Sefardíes: y otras locuciones típicas de los sefardíes de Salónica y otros sitios de Oriente. Ameller/Riopiedras. 1978
Foundation for the Advancement of Sephardic Studies and Culture. EE.UU. 2004.
Molho, Rena, La destrucción de la judería de Salónica.


HOTELS (works of art)

Till the Great Fire of 1917 most of the city first class and luxury hotels were situated in the French Quarter (in a place very close to the city port that is) and the nearby areas (e.g. Liberty Square and Nikis Avenue). After 1917 most of the hotels in these areas were destroyed by the fire. Following the Hebrard Plan most of the city's new Hotels were built in Egnatia Street and the nearby areas (namely in Antigonidon, Leondos Sofou, Singrou, Svoronou, Ptolemeon, Zaliki and Olimbou streets) while a few (as a rule more luxurious than those of Egnatia street) were built in Ayias Sofias, Mitropoleos, Komninon, Venizelou and Tsimiski streets. About 22 of them are still in operation.

ANTIGONIDON STREET
imperial Palace
Egnatia

AYIAS SOFIAS STREET
Astoria I
Astoria II
Balcan Europe

EGNATIA STREET (Egnatia area *)
Acropol *
Alexandria
Argo
Atlantis
Atlas
Averof *
Avgoustos *
Diethnes (demolished)
Egnatia
Emborikon
Eyiptos *
Grande Bretagne
ilisia
Kastoria
Megas Alexandros
Minerva
Modern
Niki *
Thessalia
Thessalikon (ca 1930, 60 Egnatia str.)
Vienna
Zaliki *


OIL MARKET DISTRICT
Hotel des Postes et Telegraphes (currently Bristol Capsis)
(Mediterranean Palace)***

KOMNINON STREET
Continental (currently Andromeda)
Excelsior
Luxembourg
Tourist

MITROPOLEOS STREET
Electra Palace
Ritz (demolished)

OLIMBOU STREET
Orestias-Kastoria

SINGROU STREET
Nea Mitropolis
Modeli

TSIMISKI STREET
Lux Palace (Grand Palace)

Vlali Market (Kapani) - Αγορά Βλάλη (Καπάνι)

The Vlali Market -built in a pseudo-byzantine style imposed by the Hebrard plan after the 1917 Fire- covers a square block between Venizelou Street in the west, Halkeon street in the east, Egnatia street in the north and Ermou street in the south.
It was built exactly where the Arhiravinias Square (= Square of the Archirabbi Residence) stood before the 1917 Great Fire and serves as a food, groceries and clothing market.
The traditionally built structures of the market were severely hit by the 1978 earthquake, a few were deserted for quite a long time, some of them were carefully restored but the market is in constant decline following the historical commercial city centre's general decline trend.

APOCYNACEAE

Absolmsia, Adenium, Apteranthes, Asclepias, Aspidoglossum, Aspidonepsis, Baynesia, Brachystelma, Caralluma, Ceropegia, Cibirhiza, Cynanchum, Dischidia, Dischidiopsis, Duvalia, Duvaliandra, Echidnopsis, Edithcolea, Fanninia, Fockea, Glossostelma, Hoodia, Hoya, Huernia, Huerniopsis, Ischnolepis, Larryleachia, Lavrania, Madangia, Mandevilla, Marsdenia, Matelea, Micholitzia, Miraglossum, Notechidnopsis, Odontostelma, Ophionella, Orbea, Orbeanthus, Pachycarpus, Pachypodium, Pectinaria, Petopentia, Piaranthus, Plumeria, Pseudolithos, Quaqua, Raphionacme, Rhytidocaulon, Riocreuxia, Sarcorrhiza, Sarcostemma, Schizoglossum, Schlechterella, Stapelia, Stapelianthus, Stapeliopsis, Stathmostelma, Stenostelma, Stomatostemma, Tavaresia, Trachycalymma, Tridentea, Tromotriche, White-Sloanea, Xysmalobium

ALLAMANDA HENDERSONII



CEROPEGIA WOODII

Ceropegia woodii is a flowering plant in the genus Ceropegia (Apocynaceae), native to South Africa, Swaziland, and Zimbabwe. It is an evergreen succulent trailing vine that grows to 2-5 cm in height and spreads to reach up to 2-4 m in length. Its leaves are shaped like hearts, about 1-2 cm wide and long. When exposed to sufficient light they have a deep green colour; under insufficient lighting the leaves are pale green. With age it develops a woody caudex at its base. The roots, and occasionally the stems, will often develop tubers. On the stems these form at nodes and are likely the reason for the common name of rosary vine.
The flower is in general form similar to those of other Ceropegia species. The corolla grows to 3 cm in length and is a mixed colouring of off-white and pale magenta. The five petals are a deeper purple.
Ceropegia woodii is a very popular houseplant, often grown in hanging baskets so the long trailing branches can hang down with their leaves spaced out like a row of large beads. Several cultivars have been selected, some with variegated leaves.
It requires excellent drainage, should be watered only when dry, and should never stand in water. Excess water should be removed from plant saucer after watering. It can be grown outdoors only in subtropical and tropical areas, with a minimum temperature of 15 °C. Partial shading is useful when the plant is grown outdoors.


MANDEVILLA

Mandevilla, sometimes also wrongly called Dipladenia, is a genus of about 100 species, mostly tropical and subtropical flowering vines belonging to the Apocynaceae family.
Mandevilla is native to Central and South America and many Mandevillas come originally from the Organ Mountains forests near Rio de Janeiro in Brazil. The genus was named after Henry Mandeville (1773-1861), a British diplomat and gardener.
Mandevillas develop spectacular flowers in warm climates. The flowers come in a variety of colours, including white, pink, yellow, and red. As climbers, Mandevillas can be trained against a wall or trellis to provide a leafy green and often flowering picture of beauty. They have a tendency to attract insects like mealybugs and scales.
Mandevilla is also considered to be toxic.



STEPHANOTIS FLORIBUNDA

Stephanotis floribunda (Madagascar Jasmine) is a flowering climbing plant. Its trumpet shaped blooms are in season year-round and are a popular component of bridal bouquets. It is a vigorous climber, tough stemmed, bearing dark green leathery leaves, which grow in pairs at regular intervals along the vine. Stephanotis floribunda grows best in sunny, tropical conditions or indoors on a sunny windowsill. They can be moved outside or into a greenhouse during the summer.They can grow from 2-6 meters, and are widely cultivated as garden plants.
The flowers are waxy, star-shaped and highly scented, about 3cm long, in clusters and are produced in summer. Flowers fade to yellow after several days. They are a favourite in weddings, used in bridal bouquets, corsages and decorations. Normally the plant has to be a little old and root bound to start flowering. Once it does, the result is very rewarding. The flowers are long-lasting and sweetly scented.
Propagation is by cuttings or by the seeds, which are produced irregularly.



References : Wikipedia

PELARGONIUM

Pelargonium is a genus of flowering plants which includes about 200 species of perennial, succulent, and shrub plants, commonly known as geraniums.
Confusingly, Geranium is the correct botanical name of a separate genus. Both genera are in the Family Geraniaceae. Linnaeus originally included all the species in one genus, Geranium, but they were later separated into two genera by Charles L’Héritier in 1789. Gardeners sometimes refer to the members of Genus Pelargonium as "pelargoniums" in order to avoid the confusion, but the older common name "geranium" is still in regular use.

The first species of Pelargonium known to be cultivated was Pelargonium triste, a native of South Africa. It was probably brought to the botanical garden in Leiden before 1600 on ships which stopped at the Cape of Good Hope. In 1631, the English gardener, John Tradescant the elder, bought seeds from Rene Morin in Paris and introduced the plant to England. The name Pelargonium was introduced by Johannes Burman in 1738, from the Greek πελαργός /pelargós/ (=stork), because part of the flower looks like a stork's beak.

Other than grown for their beauty, species of Pelargonium such as P. graveolens are important in the perfume industry and are cultivated and distilled for their scent. Although scented Pelargonia exist which have smells of citrus, mint, or various fruits, the varieties with rose scents are the most important commercially. Pelargonium distillates and absolutes, commonly known as "scented geranium oil" are sometimes used to supplement or adulterate expensive rose oils.
Pelargonium leaves are usually alternate, and palmately lobed or pinnate, often on long stalks, and sometimes with light or dark patterns. The erect stems bear five-petaled flowers in umbel-like clusters called pseudoumbels. The shapes of the flowers have been bred to a variety ranging star-shaped to funnel-shaped, and colors include white, pink, red, orange-red, fuchsia to deep purple.

References : Wikipedia

Here is a collection of the hybrids i grow.


PORTULACA GRANDIFLORA

An annual plant with a rewarding flowering season in countless colours.

Portulaca grandiflora (Moss-rose Purslane or Moss-rose) is a flowering plant of the Portulacaceae family, native to Argentina, southern Brazil and Uruguay.

It is a small but fast-growing annual plant growing to 30 cm tall, though usually less. The leaves are thick and fleshy, up to 2.5 cm long, arranged alternately or in small clusters. The flowers are 2.5–3 cm diameter with five petals, variably red, orange, pink, white and yellow.

It is widely grown in temperate climates as an ornamental plant for annual bedding or as a container plant. It requires ample sunlight and well-drained soils.

Numerous cultivars have been selected for double flowers with additional petals.

References : Wikipedia

Here is a collection of the hybrids i grow.

Evangelistria Cemetery - Ευαγγελίστρια

The Greek Municipal Cemetery "Evangelistria" was founded in 1875. Till then the Greek community used to bury its dead anywhere outside the perimeter of the Eastern walls.
The cemetery is situated in the southwest part of the homonymous Quarter, just outside the City's Eastern Walls and covers an entire square block: the west limit is Elenis Zografou str., the east limit is Panepistimiou str., the south limit is Ayiou Dimitriou Avenue and the the north limit is Ayios Dimitrios Municipal Hospital.

Evangelistria Quarter (and the adjacent Saranda Eklisyes Quarter) was one of the first refugee settlements created in Thessaloniki, in the aftermath of the 1922 Asia Minor War, to house families mainly originating from Eastern and Northern Thrace.

BULBS & TUBERS

AMARYLLIS BELADONNA
ANEMONE
CALLADIUM BICOLOR,
CANNA MUSAFOLIA
CHLIDANTHUS FRAGRANS,
CLIVIA MINIATA
COLCHICUM
CROCUS SATIVUS
GLORIOSA ROTSCHILDIANA
GLORIOSA LUTEA
HIPPEASTRUM
HOSTA
HYACINTHUS
IRIS
IRIS GERMANICA
LILIUM
LILIUM NEPALENSE
NARCISSUS
NYMPHAEA
OXALIS
RANUNCULUS ASIATICUS
SAUROMATUM VENOSUM
TULIPA
ZANTEDESCHIA AETHIOPICA

Here are some of the hybrids i grow

SAINTPAULIA Africana (african violet)


Saintpaulia, commonly known as African violet, is a genus of 6 species of herbaceous perennial flowering plants in the family Gesneriaceae, native to Tanzania and the adjacent southeastern Kenya in eastern tropical Africa, with a concentration of species in the Nguru mountains of Tanzania. The genus is most closely related to Streptocarpus, with recent phyllogenetic studies suggesting it has evolved directly from subgenus Streptocarpella. The common name was given due to a superficial resemblance to true violets (Viola, family Violaceae).

The genus is named after Baron Walter von Saint Paul-illaire (1860-1910), the district commissioner of Tanga province who discovered the plant in Tanganyika (now Tanzania) in Africa in 1892 and sent seeds back to his father, an amateur botanist in Germany. Two British plant enthusiasts, Sir John Kirk and Reverend W.E. Taylor, had earlier collected and submitted specimens to Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew in 1884 and 1887 respectively, but the quality of specimens was insufficient to permit scientific description at that time. The genus Saintpaulia, and original species S. ionantha, were scientifically described by J. C. Wendland in 1893.

Saintpaulias grow from 6-15 cm tall and can be anywhere from 6-30 cm wide. The leaves are rounded to oval, 2.5-8.5 cm long with a 2-10 cm petiole, finely hairy, and with a fleshy texture. The flowers are 2-3 cm diameter, with a five-lobed velvety corolla ("petals"), and grow in clusters of 3-10 or more on slender stalks (peduncles). Flower colour in the wild species can be violet, purple, pale blue, or white.

Several of the species and subspecies are endangered and many more are threatened, due to clearance of their native cloud forest habitat for agriculture.

Saintpaulias are widely cultivated as house plants. Until recently, only a few of these species have been used in breeding programs for the hybrids available in the market; most available as house plants are cultivars derived from Saintpaulia ionantha. A wider range of species is now being looked at as sources of genes to introduce into modern cultivars.

Over 2,000 cultivars have been selected for horticultural use. There are many different leaf and flower types found; cultivars are classified as Large, Standard, Trailing, Semi-mini, Mini, and Micro - with Micro being the smallest. There is a wide range in colour from white, pink, violet, dark red, yellow to even green, and the flowers may be either single (five petals) or double (more than five, with some or all of the stamens converted into extra petals). Flowers are not always a solid colour, but can also be found in the "fantasy" variety where the petals have coloured stripes. One interesting flower form found in the African Violet are known as a "wasp"; these flowers have the upper two flower petals independently fused forming a tube. There are also compound leaves on some, that are called "bustled".

Saintpaulias can be propagated by leaf cuttings (essential for propagating named cultivars) or seed (from which new cultivars are selected). African violets prefer a constant temperature between 20-25 °C (68-77 °F) with high humidity, and thrive best planted in well-drained humus or compost.

References : Wikipedia

Here is a collection of the hybrids i used to grow.

Ziller Ernst (Έρνστ Τσίλερ)

(1837-1923)
Greek Consulate (ca 1893, Ελληνικό Προξενείο, aka Macedonian Struggle Museum - Μουσείο Μακεδονικού Αγώνα, Ayias Sofias & Proksenou Koromila str.),
Greek Community High School (ca 1893, Γυμνάσιο Ελληνικης κοινότητας Θεσσαλονίκης, 132 Egnatia str.),
Mitropoli (Cathedral) (ca 1891, Μητρόπολη, Mitropoleos & Ayias Sofias str., plans revised by Xenofondas Peonidis)


Frissiras Mansion (ca 1907, Plaka)

Melas Building (ca 1874, Eolou & Sofokleous & Straight & Kratinoy str., Kodzia Square),

National Theater (ca 1895-1901, Agiou Konstantinou str, Athens)

Schliemann Mansion (ca 1878-81, Panepistimiou str.)

Stathatos Mansion (ca 1895, Vassilissis Sofias & Irodotou str.)

Town Hall (ca 1876-91, Ermoupoli, Syros)

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